1. Driving

Valid Irish insurance discs will serve as proof of insurance for those driving Irish-registered vehicles in the UK, including Northern Ireland, in the event of a no-deal Brexit. The Motor Insurers’ Bureau of Ireland (MIBI) announced that it has struck a deal with the UK Department of Transport. In advance of the original Brexit deadline of 29 March, the MIBI had cautioned that the Green Card – an internationally recognised insurance document – would be required for all Irish-registered vehicles travelling in the UK, if a no-deal Brexit occurred. That will no longer be the case, following a deal between the group and the UK’s Department of Transport, which MIBI Chief Executive David Fitzgerald hailed as “really positive news”. However, motorists have been advised that Green Cards will still be required for UK-registered vehicles visiting European Union countries, including Ireland, in the event of a no-deal Brexit. The cards will not be required if an agreement is reached between the UK and the EU on Brexit, or if a transitional arrangement is implemented.

 

  1. Freedom of movement

Britain will immediately end freedom of movement for people from the European Union after Brexit on 31 October, a spokeswoman for Downing Street has said. The spokeswoman said: “Freedom of movement as it currently stands will end on 31 October when the UK leaves the EU.” She added the UK government planned “tougher criminality rules for people entering the UK” as part of the new hard-line stance. “Details of other changes immediately on 31 October for a new immigration system are currently being developed,” she said. Around 3.6 million EU citizens already in Britain have been told to apply for “permanent settled status”, under an interior ministry scheme started by Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s predecessor Theresa May. So far only around one million have signed up for the status. Mrs May’s government said in January that it would end free movement “as soon as possible” after a no-deal Brexit, but keep allowing EU arrivals “for a transitional period only”. Legislation drawn up to deal with the issue is stuck in parliament in the House of Commons gridlock over Brexit. However, the Irish Government says Irish citizens will keep their rights under the Common Travel Area deal, which pre-dates EU membership.

 

  1. Common Travel Area

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has told Taoiseach Leo Varadkar that the Common Travel Area will not be affected by the ending of freedom of movement after Brexit. The two leaders spoke last week for more than an hour. The talks were dominated by Brexit and the issues surrounding the Withdrawal Agreement, particularly the backstop. Mr Johnson’s comments on the Common Travel Area come after a Downing Street spokesperson said Britain would immediately end freedom of movement for people from the European Union after Brexit on 31 October. The Common Travel Area, which pre-dates both countries’ EU membership, allows Irish and British citizens to move freely and reside in either jurisdiction. They also enjoy associated rights and entitlements, including access to employment, healthcare, education, social benefits, and the right to vote in certain elections. The two leaders have also agreed to meet in Dublin next month. “The Prime Minister made clear that the Common Travel Area, which long predates the UK and Ireland joining the EU, would not be affected by the ending of freedom of movement after Brexit. “They agreed that their teams would maintain close contact over the coming weeks, while recognising that negotiations take place between the UK and the EU27 Task Force. “They also agreed to meet in Dublin in early September.”

 

Sources: Journal.ie, RTE News